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A Glimpse Into Eid-Al-Fitr Traditions Around The World

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May 08, 2021
11:00 A.M.
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Eid-al-Fitr is a three-day-long festivity that follows after Ramadan. The Muslim community worldwide celebrates this occasion by dressing up, preparing delicious meals, and giving alms (Zakat-al-Fitr).

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Just like the holy month of Ramadan, Eid is a special time for Muslims. After engaging in a month-long fasting period, Muslims are blessed with this joyous event that unites people and bestows them with the religious fervor to help those in need.

The night before Eid is spent selecting clothes, jewelry items, and other accessories. Women also apply henna or mehndi on their hands and prepare special desserts to mark this celebration. Let’s have a look at how Eid-al-Fitr is celebrated around the world.

Turkey

Photo By Burak Karaduman On Unsplash

Photo By Burak Karaduman On Unsplash

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The Turkish refer to Eid-al-Fitr as Seker Bayram, meaning the Sugar Feast. They celebrate this occasion by meeting and greeting each other, preparing delicious Turkish delights, and flocking the beaches to cherish the fun-filled moments.

Indonesia

Photo By Gradikaa Aggi On Unsplash

Photo By Gradikaa Aggi On Unsplash

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Indonesians engage in grand Eid-al-Fitr celebrations and call this occasion Lebaran. Drum rolls and bangs announce the joyous occasion, the streets are fully lit, and people flock the malls and markets to shop for their favorite items.

Malaysia

Photo By Fahrul Azmi On Unsplash

Photo By Fahrul Azmi On Unsplash

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Malaysians observe Eid by spending time with their family, with many people traveling back to their home cities. Traditional Malaysian food is prepared, and the houses are decorated with oil lamps. The doors are left open for everyone (regardless of their faith) to join in the celebrations.

Saudi Arabia

Photo By Rezki Trianto On Unsplash

Photo By Rezki Trianto On Unsplash

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Eid is celebrated with sheer enthusiasm and religious fervor in Saudi Arabia. The entire country is exquisitely decorated, and people come together to share food, love, and joy. The elders also give children Eidi (money).

The Eid prayer is offered in congregations in Makkah, Medinah, and other cities. Saudis also have a tradition of supplying food and other items to the less fortunate people on a massive scale.

Pakistan

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Photo By Ahmad Ali On Unsplash

Photo By Ahmad Ali On Unsplash

Pakistanis celebrate Eid-al-Fitr by engaging in excessive Eid shopping. The night before is spent applying henna. The Eid morning starts with the morning prayer, after which unique Eid desserts and other delicious recipes are prepared.

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Families come together to feast upon the palatable meals. Just like the Saudi tradition, children demand Eidi from their elders. The Pakistani Muslims also give Zakat-al-Fitr to uplift the less fortunate people.

Egypt

Photo By REFAAT SEOUDY On Unsplash

Photo By REFAAT SEOUDY On Unsplash

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Egyptians start the Eid day by offering the morning prayer, after which they visit their elders and spend time with them. The elders also give Eidi to children. Many people turn to public places like gardens and zoos to spend quality time with their loved ones.

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